24 July 2024
Nature Water Treatment: Improving Asia's Liveability

All images are AI generated

Spread the love

Exploring Nature-Based Water Treatment Solutions

In the face of escalating industrialization, urbanization, and climate change in Asia, maintaining water quality has become a significant challenge. To address this issue, a collaborative effort led by RMIT University has been initiated to support pilot projects in Vietnam, Sri Lanka, and the Philippines through the Asia-Pacific Network for Global Change Research project. The main focus of these projects is to explore and implement nature-based solutions for water treatment.

One of the key initiatives involved the construction of floating wetlands in Can Tho, Vietnam, and Kandy, Sri Lanka, as well as green roofs in Ho Chi Minh City and constructed wetlands in the Philippines. These projects aimed to effectively remove pollutants from water bodies, providing environmental and communal benefits to the regions. For example, in Vietnam, a green roof using rock, oyster shells, and charcoal was set up on the roof of a research center at Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology for domestic wastewater treatment.

Benefits of Nature-Based Solutions

The use of nature-based solutions for water treatment offers several advantages over traditional methods. Nature-based solutions are popular in Europe for making cities greener and utilizing urban resources in a more sustainable and circular manner. In Southeast Asia, traditional resource management practices that are inherently nature-based have often been overlooked or limited to rural areas. By integrating nature-based solutions in urban areas, cities can become more sustainable, resilient, and liveable.

Related Video

Published on: October 17, 2011 Description: An Eco-Friendly waste water treatment system was installed by FRANC Environmental at Rodale Institute located in Kutztown, PA.
Eco-Friendly Wastewater Treatment System
Play

The collaborative effort between teams in the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Vietnam, Australia, and Spain highlights the importance of global cooperation in implementing nature-based solutions. By leveraging the expertise and support from diverse stakeholders, the project aims to develop solutions that are tailored to local conditions and are effective in addressing water quality issues in urban areas.

Future Directions and Expansion

The success of the pilot projects has paved the way for future initiatives focused on building capacities and engaging communities in the design and utilization of nature-based solutions across a broader range of sites in the region. This approach emphasizes the importance of local consultation and stakeholder engagement in developing sustainable water treatment solutions that are suitable for diverse urban environments.

The team’s application for a follow-up project underscores their commitment to furthering the adoption of nature-based solutions in urban water treatment. By expanding the scope of their work and involving more people in the process, the project aims to create a lasting impact on water quality management in Southeast Asian cities.

Conclusion

Turning to nature-based solutions for water treatment represents a promising approach to addressing the challenges posed by industrialization, urbanization, and climate change in Asia. The collaborative efforts led by RMIT University have demonstrated the effectiveness of integrating nature-based techniques such as floating wetlands and green roofs in urban water treatment systems. By replicating and scaling these solutions, Southeast Asian cities can become more sustainable, resilient, and liveable while also improving water quality for their residents. The ongoing commitment to expanding these initiatives and engaging local communities underscores the potential for nature-based solutions to play a significant role in shaping the future of water treatment practices in urban areas.

Links to additional Resources:

1. nature.com 2. sciencedirect.com 3. ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Related Wikipedia Articles

Topics: Nature-based water treatment, RMIT University, Urban water treatment

Water treatment
Water treatment is any process that improves the quality of water to make it appropriate for a specific end-use. The end use may be drinking, industrial water supply, irrigation, river flow maintenance, water recreation or many other uses, including being safely returned to the environment. Water treatment removes contaminants and...
Read more: Water treatment

Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology
The Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (abbreviated as RMIT University) is a public research university in Melbourne, Australia. Founded in 1887 by Francis Ormond, RMIT began as a night school offering classes in art, science and technology in response to the industrial revolution in Australia. It was a private college...
Read more: Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology

Water treatment
Water treatment is any process that improves the quality of water to make it appropriate for a specific end-use. The end use may be drinking, industrial water supply, irrigation, river flow maintenance, water recreation or many other uses, including being safely returned to the environment. Water treatment removes contaminants and...
Read more: Water treatment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *