13 June 2024
EU car CO2 emissions rise again

All images are AI generated

Spread the love

EU car CO2 emissions have failed to be cut despite tighter regulations, a report by the bloc’s internal auditor found Thursday. Bigger, more powerful cars have negated the impact of the regulations.

EU Car CO2 Emissions: A Deeper Dive into the Challenges



Related Video

Published on: March 25, 2022 Description: Car manufacturers must ensure that the average CO2 emissions of newly-registered cars do not exceed company-specific targets ...
CO2 emission standards for cars
Play

The Challenge:

The European Union (EU) has been striving to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from cars, aiming to mitigate climate change and improve air quality. However, a recent report by the bloc’s internal auditor reveals that despite regulations, EU car CO2 emissions have not been reduced as expected.

Key Findings:

EU Car CO2 Emissions: Increased Size and Power: The report highlights that the increased size and power of cars have offset the impact of CO2 emission regulations. Between 2011 and 2022, the average car mass increased by approximately 10%, while engine power surged by 25%. This negated the gains made by technological advancements in engine efficiency.

EU Car CO2 Emissions: Testing Discrepancies: Loopholes in regulations allowed automakers to conduct laboratory tests instead of real-world driving conditions. This resulted in significant discrepancies between emissions measured in the lab and those emitted on the road. The infamous Dieselgate scandal in 2015 brought this issue to light, leading to stricter testing methods.

EU Car CO2 Emissions: Hybrid and Electric Vehicles: While the adoption of hybrid and electric vehicles has helped reduce emissions, their impact has been limited. The report indicates that new car emissions only began to drop significantly in 2020, primarily due to the uptake of electric vehicles. However, real-world CO2 emissions from combustion engine cars have remained largely unchanged.

EU Car CO2 Emissions: Persistent Transport Emissions: Despite efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in various sectors, CO2 emissions in the transport sector have continued to rise. In 2021, the transport sector accounted for 23% of the EU’s total greenhouse gas emissions, with passenger cars contributing to more than half of this share.

Wrapping Up:

The report underscores the challenges in reducing CO2 emissions from cars in the EU. While regulations have been put in place, the increasing size and power of cars, loopholes in testing procedures, and the limited impact of hybrid and electric vehicles have hindered progress. Addressing these issues requires a comprehensive approach, including stricter regulations, improved testing methods, and continued investment in sustainable transportation solutions..

FAQ’s

What is the main reason for the lack of progress in reducing CO2 emissions from cars in the EU?

The increased size and power of cars, as well as discrepancies between laboratory testing and real-world driving conditions, have offset the impact of CO2 emission regulations.

How have cars become larger and more powerful?

The report highlights that the average car mass increased by approximately 10% between 2011 and 2022, while engine power surged by 25%, due to factors such as increased safety features and consumer preferences.

What are the loopholes in the regulations that allow automakers to conduct laboratory tests instead of real-world driving conditions?

The report does not specify the exact loopholes, but it mentions that these practices came to light during the Dieselgate scandal in 2015, leading to stricter testing methods.

What is the impact of hybrid and electric vehicles on reducing CO2 emissions?

The report indicates that new car emissions only began to drop significantly in 2020, primarily due to the uptake of electric vehicles. However, real-world CO2 emissions from combustion engine cars have remained largely unchanged.

Why do CO2 emissions in the transport sector continue to rise?

The report highlights that despite efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in various sectors, CO2 emissions in the transport sector have continued to rise, with passenger cars contributing to more than half of this share, due to factors such as increasing car ownership and usage.

Links to additional Resources:

1. https://www.eea.europa.eu/ 2. https://www.transportenvironment.org/ 3. https://www.acea.be/

Related Wikipedia Articles

Topics: EU car CO2 emissions, Dieselgate scandal, Electric vehicles

European Union Emissions Trading System
The European Union Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) is a carbon emission trading scheme (or cap and trade scheme) which began in 2005 and is intended to lower greenhouse gas emissions by the European Union countries. Cap and trade schemes limit emissions of specified pollutants over an area and allow...
Read more: European Union Emissions Trading System

Volkswagen emissions scandal
The Volkswagen emissions scandal, sometimes known as Dieselgate or Emissionsgate, began in September 2015, when the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a notice of violation of the Clean Air Act to German automaker Volkswagen Group. The agency had found that Volkswagen had intentionally programmed turbocharged direct injection (TDI)...
Read more: Volkswagen emissions scandal

Electric vehicle
An electric vehicle (EV) is a vehicle that uses one or more electric motors for propulsion. The vehicle can be powered by a collector system, with electricity from extravehicular sources, or can be powered autonomously by a battery or by converting fuel to electricity using a generator or fuel cells....
Read more: Electric vehicle

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *