20 June 2024
Stability Points in Granular Arrangements Determine Fruit Stand Capacity

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A collaborative effort by physicists and mechanical engineers from Universidad de Antofagasta, Universidad Autónoma de Chile, and Universidad de O’Higgins has led to the discovery of stability points in granular monolayers. This finding aids in understanding the maximum capacity of fruit stands before they reach the brink of collapse, by analyzing the stability of granular arrangements with inclined slopes.

Calculating the Number of Oranges That Can Be Plucked from a Fruit Stand Before It Collapses



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Published on: January 2, 2019 Description: 2. Dissipation potentials and the stability of granular flow by Joe Goddard.
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Hey there, science enthusiasts! Today, I want to talk about a fascinating study conducted by a team of physicists and mechanical engineers from universities in Chile. They’ve come up with a way to determine the stability points of piles of fruits, specifically oranges, in a fruit stand.

Why Do We Need to Know?

You might be wondering why anyone would bother studying the stability of fruit piles. Well, have you ever been to a grocery store and seen those beautifully arranged fruit displays? They’re meant to entice us with their deliciousness, but they can also be a bit precarious. One wrong move, and the whole pile could come crashing down, with fruit rolling all over the floor.

That’s where this study comes in. The researchers wanted to find out at what point a pile of oranges would collapse if one or more oranges were removed from the edge. By understanding this, they can help grocery stores create more stable displays and prevent fruit avalanches.

The Research Process

To conduct their study, the team used computer simulations to model spheres, like oranges, stacked with different edge slopes. They ran these simulations with various configurations, from modest slopes to extreme ones.

What they found was pretty interesting. They discovered that piles with extreme slopes can collapse if just one orange is removed from the sloped edge. On the other hand, for piles with more moderate slopes, you can actually remove quite a few oranges without causing a collapse.

It gets trickier when you’re somewhere in between extreme and moderate slopes. Slowly increasing the slope angle can lead to situations where removing multiple oranges, instead of just one, could result in a collapse.

The Magic Number

Now, I know you’re all wondering, “How many oranges can I pluck before the whole pile collapses?” Well, on average, the researchers calculated that up to 10% of the oranges in the pile would need to be removed before a collapse.

So, if you’re at the grocery store and you want to grab an orange, don’t worry too much. If you’re the first one to take an orange from a specific spot, you’re unlikely to cause a collapse. But if you notice that several oranges have already been taken from the same location, you might want to be a bit more cautious.

Future Directions

The researchers aren’t stopping here. They plan to continue their work and explore other real-world scenarios where collapses could happen. They’re interested in studying piles of rocks of different sizes, for example.

By understanding the stability of various piles, they can help us create safer environments and prevent accidents. Who knew that studying fruit piles could have such practical applications?

So, next time you’re at the grocery store and see those beautifully arranged fruit displays, you can appreciate the science behind them. And remember, be mindful of your fruit-plucking actions to avoid any unexpected collapses!

FAQ’s

1. Why is it important to study the stability of fruit piles?

Studying the stability of fruit piles helps prevent accidents and fruit avalanches in grocery stores, creating safer environments for shoppers.

2. How did the researchers conduct their study?

The researchers used computer simulations to model spheres, like oranges, stacked with different edge slopes.

3. How many oranges can be removed before a collapse?

On average, up to 10% of the oranges in the pile can be removed before a collapse.

4. Should I be cautious when taking oranges from a specific spot?

If you’re the first one to take an orange from a specific spot, you’re unlikely to cause a collapse. However, if several oranges have already been taken from the same location, it’s advisable to be more cautious.

5. What are the future directions of this research?

The researchers plan to explore other real-world scenarios where collapses could happen, such as studying piles of rocks of different sizes.

Links to additional Resources:

Universidad de Antofagasta Universidad Autónoma de Chile Universidad de O’Higgins

Related Wikipedia Articles

Topics: Universidad de Antofagasta, Universidad Autónoma de Chile, Universidad de O'Higgins

University of Antofagasta
The University of Antofagasta (also referred to as UA) is a public research university located in Antofagasta, Chile. It is a derivative university part of the Chilean Traditional Universities.
Read more: University of Antofagasta

Autonomous University of Chile
The Universidad Autónoma de Chile (UAutónoma) is a private Chilean university. It has campuses in Temuco, Talca and Santiago (Providencia and Llano Subercaseaux). It is affiliated to SUA (Single Admission System of Rector's Council of Chilean Universities.The university is accredited by CNA-Chile (National Accreditation commission) for a term of 4...
Read more: Autonomous University of Chile

O'Higgins F.C.
O'Higgins Fútbol Club (Spanish: [oˈxiɣins ˈfuðβol ˈkluβ]), also known as O'Higgins de Rancagua, is a Chilean professional football club based in Rancagua, that currently plays in the Campeonato Nacional. The club's home stadium is Estadio El Teniente, opened in 1945 and renovated for the 2015 Copa América, which was hosted...
Read more: O'Higgins F.C.

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